Lady Bird review

In Lady Bird we meet Christine, a 17 year old high school senior frustrated with adolescent life and bored of her Sacramento upbringing. We follow Christine, who now demands to be called Lady Bird, during her senior year of school as she embarks on first relationships, applies to colleges and discovers the importance of true friendship. The central theme of the film is Lady Bird‘s relationship with her mum, played beautifully by Laurie Metcalf. It’s a seemingly simple story of every day life that brims with heart.

Greta Gerwig’s first feature length film has had critics and audiences raving. It even holds the highest rating to ever have been handed out by Rotten Tomatoes, certifying it as one of the most applauded releases of the year. Gerwig handles every relationship Lady Bird experiences with a unique realism that is often missing in coming-of-age films and entries into the genre are usually quirky indie films with small budgets but big ambitions. Recent notable examples are The Perks of Being a Wallflower and James Pondsolt’s exceptional The Spectacular Now. Greta Gerwig explores similar themes to those films but here focuses in on the tumultuous love shared between a mother and her daughter, and it’s told with an inimitable caring eye and loving touch, one that hasn’t been seen on film in a long while. Seemingly throwaway moments, like when Lady Bird turns 18 and buys a pack of camels, a scratch card and Playgirl – just to celebrate the freedom of her new age – perfectly showcases how it feels to be on the cusp of adulthood.

Saoirse Ronan plays Lady Bird with ease, channeling the complexity of being 17 with such severe talent. Metcalf is similarly fantastic, and it’s astonishing that these women, and this film, didn’t clean up at the awards. But it doesn’t matter, not really. Everyone who has seen Lady Bird knows just how remarkable it is, a once-every-few-years gem. It’s a feature that reminds you why film is important. It’s a film that lifts you up, and makes life feel better. It’s a film that celebrates our idiosyncrasies. And most importantly, it’s a film that joyously revels in not fitting in, and embracing your quirky, eccentric, individual self.

Gerwig’s main focus is on Lady Bird‘s relationship with her mum, and there are several notable scenes that give this film real heart. Metcalf’s turn as Marion is a stunning performance, incredibly dynamic yet understated and drawn from life. There’s no unnecessary dramatics here just simple, effective storytelling, with characters played by some of Hollywood’s most talented. Lucas Hedges also gives a moving performance, leading a sub-plot that is achingly poignant.

Lady Bird is a fiercly unique character who, at times, is desperate to fit in and experience as much as possible. As an audience, we’ve all been there and it’s the relatability of this narrative aspect that gives the film its universal appeal.The soundtrack is a nostalgic dream too, and the 2002 setting is equally enjoyable. Special mention must go to April Napier’s costume design; there’s a lot of humour in seeing certain fashions come full circle.

Lady Bird is so supremely special. Greta Gerwig has created something that brims with warmth and wit, that at its core runs on an emotional depth that will seep into your soul and refuse to let go. I left the cinema with joy, smiling at the story I’d just seen, feeling as though I was now part of a secret club that got to see this mega piece of cinema. But, of course, it’s not a secret club, because Lady Bird has received worldwide recognition. I reveled in every second of pleasure the film offers, and I can’t wait to show this film to every person I love, so they can fall for it just as I have.

Brooklyn, review

As far as film-making goes the John Crowley-directed, Nick Hornby-written Brooklyn is damn near flawless. With a wonderful screenplay, charismatic cast and envious costume design, the feature is a joy on the eyes as it transports you to another time. That time is the 1950’s, when the American Dream was a hope for many and immigration figures were tripling. We follow shy Irish girl Eilis to Brooklyn and back as she discovers herself and the life she seemingly wants to live.

John Crowley has taken a sentimental novel, written by Colm Toibin, and adapted it into a gorgeous film full of beauty and raw emotion, cleverly capturing the feeling of being young and lost and young and in love. Saorise Ronan portrays Eilis, Oscar-nominated for her role and rightfully so. If you ever had any doubts about the actress who has more than proved her on-screen talents, Crowley’s film will eradicate these surely. Ronan is sensational in her leading role, sure not to over-complicated Eilis – or more importantly, perfect her. Human like us all, the character is relatable and likeable and the transformation we see over a short 112 minutes is masterfully crafted by actress and director Crowley.

cohen and ronan in brooklyn

cohen and ronan in brooklyn

Supporting Ronan is Emory Cohen – almost unrecognisable here from his divergent role in The Place Beyond the Pines – and industry favourite Domhnall Gleeson, with added strength in the shape of Jim Broadbent and Julie Walters. The star in this exceptional ensemble is Cohen. He’s endearing as Tony, an Italian-American with more than enough personality, and even more beguiling charm than you’d expect from an actor who is slowly (but ever so surely) rising to Hollywood prominence – and his performance in Brooklyn should sure enough cement him as a force to be reckoned with. The chemistry he shares with Roman is so natural and innocent – the kind of schoolboy love that we all secretly wish we could experience. Crowley does well to translate this from page to screen without an aspect of uncomfortable cheese that is too often present in contemporary romances.

The entire cast comes together to form a full feature that is never lacking in presence or meaning. Hornby writes with a warmth film-goers have come to recognise and appreciate and he transcends a time in history without making this a boring historical feature. Brooklyn escapes the pitfalls of most romantic dramas to make this a beautiful – and timeless – piece of cinema that tugs on the heartstrings in all of the right ways. More than this, the movie shouldn’t just appeal to woman, or fans of Toibin’s novel, for it is a rounded narrative that escapes the normal ties of genre film-making, speaking from a place within us all as it explores what it is to be human as Eilis steps outside of her comfort zone for the first time.

See Brooklyn and as you do, let go of any preconceptions of what this genre is and can be, for Crowley loses them all and recreates it so effortlessly here.