The OA season two review

The OA, Netflix’s bizarre, otherworldly drama, first appeared on our screens in 2016. It was a whirlwind ride of near death experiences, strange dance moves and teenage angst that ended on a cliffhanger which allowed it to transcend its mythical realm and echo terrifying real life trauma. Cut to three years later and the series has finally made its eagerly-anticipated return but it’s more confusing than ever and strangely detached from its predecessor.

Brit Marling’s sci-fi drama series was gone so long that, much to the relief of its returning fans, it began with a lengthy reminder of what took place in season one. We were collectively reminded of Marling’s Prairie / OA, a beguiling young woman who returns to her small town after disappearing for seven years. Season one mixed two major storylines: flashbacks to OA‘s life as Hap‘s (a brilliant Jason Isaacs) prisoner and her new life in the present among a mismatched group of outsiders. The formula worked well but series two loses itself to big budget moments, forgoing the touching dialogue and in-depth study of human nature that season one thrived on. Instead, this new incarnation takes us on a confusing journey towards giant octopus, interactive games and mysterious houses. It’s still engulfing as a narrative, but feels, oddly, like a totally different creation from that of the first season. The only moments that echo the first, in terms of direction and narrative tropes, are the three episodes that centre around BBA, Steve and gang, and the whole piece suffers because of this.MV5BZjVhYTMyYTktZGFhMi00M2ZmLTlhMTAtZWM2NzNiZDkwYmZlXkEyXkFqcGdeQWFybm8@._V1_CR0,68,3600,2025_AL_UX477_CR0,0,477,268_AL_

While the effects are impressive, and something to be marvelled at, they don’t feel as though they belong in this piece. Series one was so gritty and played on this idea that certain aspects could indeed happen; it mixed harrowing drama with fantastical elements and turned out something that scared us with a strange kind of sci-fi realism. Series two loses touch with its humanity, instead focusing on seemingly unrelated (not to mention unexplained) sub-plots. While the season suffers because of this, it redeems itself with the return of the fabulous Phyllis Smith and the introduction of Kingsley Ben Adir as new character Karim. The best moments of this suspend-your-belief series come from both actors and Adir is a total joy to watch as he steps his way to stardom. There are moments of horror in this new series too, but not the real-life kind, the best-of-the-genre kind. The slow-creeping dread and jolting scares are effective and enjoyable and make for a welcome addition to a show that tries to cram a lot of unnecessary moments into what was, initially, a relatively simple starting point.

The OA is still an interesting watch; Brit Marling is a fierce talent as writer, actor and producer, alongside artistic partner Zal Batmanglij. The pair dive deeper into the unknown, exploring the multiverse with probing interest which translates enthusiastically, if a little confusingly. The heart of this show lies with OA‘s motley crew from series one and with not one scene shared in series two comes a lack of sentimentality, not to mention apathy.

Still intriguing, if a little misjudged, The OA will return for a third series but will its viewers? I for one am no longer sure.

Ash vs. Evil Dead – Gore and Giggles Never Gelled So Well

Ash vs. Evil Dead has been an anticipated series for me since I saw the initial trailer. While Fede Alvarez’s 2013 remake was too out-there for my tastes (and in honesty, too scary to sit comfortably with me too), Sam Raimi’s new comedy-horror series, distributed by Starz, looked set to be a fun thrill ride that leaned towards the cheesy humour of chainsaw arms rather than the questionable adage of mutilating trees.

bruce campbell as ash in ash vs. evil dead

bruce campbell as ash in ash vs. evil dead

Following the first installment (yes, I am three episodes late in watching), it’s safe to say that Raimi has made the right choice in allowing this series to be one that doesn’t take itself all that seriously and therefore allows wit to lead first with moments of horror following second. The latter additions are genuinely scary and the former are of laugh-out-loud quality; combined these give viewers of Ash vs. Evil Dead an all-round television experience that is light relief following Alvarez’s dark and uncomfortable film reboot.

Bruce Campbell leads the series as the titular character Ash. He’s seedy, charming and hilariously un-pc, Campbell is an on-screen genius and he revels in his chance to take the lead once again. Supporting the veteran of the Evil Dead universe is young blood Ray Santiago as Pablo and Dana Delorenzo as Kelly. The trio have an enjoyable chemistry and it’s this alone that has propelled me to want to keep on watching this unique and nostalgic series. Think of Ash vs. Evil Dead as a tribute to the 1980’s; dive bars, questionable outfits and a memorable score – it shouldn’t work, but it does. Somewhat facetious and hilariously over-the-top, if you don’t overthink the narrative too much, you’ll love it.

Fear the Walking Dead, Pilot: review

While I’ve been vocal since the big reveal of a new series that I’m not keen on the Fear the Walking Dead title, in the build-up to Sunday’s pilot episode, I began to come around to the idea of a brand new The Walking Dead spin-off. Penned as a sister series, FTWD brings audiences a bunch of new characters, a vibrant LA setting, and an insightful look into the build-up to the apocalypse. The Walking Dead begins in the midst of the outbreak- most people have already been eaten or turned, and we are placed with just a handful of survivors, with little in the way of clues or answers regarding the initial virus. This in itself raised lots of questions for members of the fan canon, more so now that the Robert Kirkman mega-series is about to go into its sixth season. Because of the total success of the graphic-novel adapted AMC series, I was pretty doubtful at how original, compelling – and even enjoyable – Fear the Walking Dead would be. It turns out, following the 90 minute premiere episode, it’s pretty damn good. To that, I let out a sigh of relief as I begin to eagerly await the next installment.

curtis, dickens and dillane in fear the walking dead

curtis, dickens and dillane in fear the walking dead

The whole idea that this prequel begins right at the start of the outbreak is such a refreshing approach to a genre which is still loved by many, but tired in several aspects. It’s rare to watch an undead project that gives its audience the low-down from the beginning moments of what caused humans to become flesh-eating monsters, and to see writers Kirkman and Dave Erickson work with that here is an exciting turning point for this category of entertainment. Gale Anne Hurd and David Alpert are attached as executive producers, and while the majority of WD‘s crew have turned their attentions to the making of this new series, we are inundated with a host of unfamiliar faces. With no Andrew Lincoln or Norman Reedus in sight, we dive into the turbulent world of 18 year old heroin addict Nick (Frank Dillane), his worried mum Madison (FNL alumni Kim Dickens), his sister Alicia (Alycia Debnam-Carey) and new step-dad on the scene Travis (Cliff Curtis).

Appearing as a drama series and containing few familiar tropes of the horror genre, Fear the Walking Dead has boldly set out to become something of originality. While the ‘Walking Dead comparisons will remain for the first few episodes, expect Kirkman’s escapades into the world of Hollywood zombies to surpass expectations and become independently – and rightfully – known as its own work. Clearly a slow-burner, don’t expect tonnes of gratuitous gore and a decaying cityscape all in series one, but what you can get geared for, is a character-driven narrative that concentrates on relevant societal themes. I won’t give anything away in terms of spoilers, because it needs to be seen from a fresh perspective, but if the remaining five episodes can shape up to be anything like this initial introduction, we are in for a televisual treat. It’s nice to be pleasantly surprised, right?