Murder on the Orient Express Review

Kenneth Branagh directs a star-studded big-screen adaptation of Agatha Christie’s famed murder mystery in this fun, paired-back thriller.

Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express features lavish set pieces and creates atmosphere with snowy motifs and a brooding, genre-specific score. It’s not perfect, and it certainly doesn’t present anything out of the ordinary, but it’s a fun ode to a bygone style of filmmaking and is impressively extravagant in scale. Perhaps most enjoyable is the ensemble the director has managed to unite; Academy Award winners Penelope Cruz and Judi Dench, alongside nominees such as Michelle Pfeiffer and Johnny Depp, featuring stage veteran and Branagh favourite Derek Jacobi. There’s a bunch of relative newcomers too in the shape of Daisy Ridley, Sergei Polunin and Lucy Boynton. It’s a who’s who of the industry and benefits hugely because of it.

The story itself is familiar; a murder happens on board the Orient Express, a train packed with the wealthy and powerful. The ‘best’ detective in the world, Hercule Poirot (Branagh), must solve the crime before they arrive at their destination and it’s left to the authorities to handle. The joy in the whodunit genre is in us, the audience, working out who is the criminal and who is innocent. But in this unique tale it’s a lot harder to figure it out than one might first have thought. Michael Green was in charge of adapting the screenplay from Christie’s story and has done so with what one would assume is fierce loyalty for the source material. Branagh injects wit where neccessary and despite the dark nature of the genre, the film itself isn’t bulked down by it.

Murder on the Orient Express is in no way exceptional but it’s entirely watchable, and serves as a real treat to see such Hollywood heavy’s all lined up together (quite literally, in one scene).

 

 

Dunkirk

Christopher Nolan’s newest feature shouldn’t be called a film. It should be called an experience. Dunkirk is harrowing, heartbreaking and stunningly shot – and you won’t see a more affecting film this year (or perhaps even in the years to come).

Nolan tells the story of the World War ll Dunkirk evacuation in this, his directorial masterpiece. The director seamlessly weaves together three timelines, bringing together an ensemble cast who’s actions stir more than their words. In a genius creative decision, Nolan follows a set of characters in a week on the beach, an hour as a fighter pilot in the sky and a day on a civilian boat sent to bring home the stranded soldiers. Witnessing events from these three viewpoints allows for a layered look at the complexity of this rescue mission.

Dunkirk is fiercely told through body language, stark and stunning visuals and a pounding, relentless original score by Hans Zimmer. Nolan has united an ensemble cast that sees established talent alongside breakout stars – not one man lets this piece down.

It wouldn’t be enough to say that Dunkirk is a triumph of what cinema can achieve, and it’s unlikely it will be replicated in all of its cinematic genius anytime soon. From the intensity of fighter pilots in the sky to the heart-wrenching depiction of the deaths of young men at war, Nolan grabs his audience from the very first moment and refuses to let go. This is the re-telling of a tragic moment in history and one that is told here with aching intimacy.

Dunkirk is relentlessly paced, never allowing its viewer to take a rest from the stark reality of the situation; much like the men who were trapped there. Claustrophobic spaces are juxtaposed with expansive photography of the beach and the vast sea that separates France and Britain, and when Nolan allows you above water or into an open space you can’t help but breathe a sigh of relief. The word immersive is thrown around a lot, but this piece of cinema might just be the new definition for it.

The war epic, a relatively short 106 minutes in length, is free from the bloody spectacle of most war films and features only one swear word, while dialogue itself is generally scarce – there isn’t a sentimental monologue in-sight. Director and Writer Nolan defies genre expectations and showcases the true impact of carefully crafted cinema without the use of gratuitous violence or offensive language.

Part character study, part inimitable war epic, Dunkirk has reinvented the genre thanks to the bold storytelling and auteur eye of its director. Respectful in its portrayal of the unthinkable horrors of war, it deserves to stay in the cinema way beyond its allotted time and – rather simply – should be seen by all.