What do you want to be when you grow up?

The most widely asked question of any adolescent is ‘what do you want to be when you grow up?’. The importance of knowing where our life is going, and who we’re going to become, is ingrained in us from an early age. I went through a few ideas. An archeologist (courtesy of Tomb Raider); the lead singer in a pop-punk band (inspired by Hayley Williams, obviously); a doctor (it looked so exciting in ER); and, well, a grown up. The youngest of four children I yearned to be older so I could be a part of the fun they were all having.

Recently I’ve been catching myself saying ‘when I grow up I want to…’ or, ‘when I’m an adult…’ and then I realise I am grown up. But the biggest question I have now is not ‘what do I want to be?’ but ‘when will I feel like I’m grown up?’ Because, to be frank, I have no idea what I’m doing. When I look at my Facebook and Instagram feed I see pictures of people my age doing genuinely adult things like buying houses, or traveling the world. Meanwhile, I still eat coco pops for breakfast and, when left unsupervised, an entire pack of biscuits. My only direct debit is to Spotify, and I also spontaneously leave jobs that don’t make me happy with no thought of the future. That’s OK, right? I’m telling myself this is OK.

An aside about the perks of being an apparent grown up:

You can have breakfast for dinner and dinner for breakfast and no one is going to tell you off. You can go to gigs and it isn’t necessary to hide bottles of water filled with vodka in the bushes outside because, get this, you are old enough to buy it yourself. Nice people you’ve never met give you overdrafts so you can still go on holiday if you have no real money. You meet all of these quirky, cool, like-minded people and you find who you belong with.

Without sounding like the title of a Britney Spears film (which, FYI, is so worth watching) there is this thing I am experiencing called a crossroads. When you’re an enthusiastic teenager teachers and parents and careers advisors forget to tell you that even if you know what you want to be it might not work out. Stuff like mental health gets in the way. The ability to afford to take unpaid opportunities that could eventually, maybe lead to a dream job. Doing what you really thought was what you wanted and then realising it is so not what you wanted after all. Being happy in something and having it taken away because, well, you were only temporary. That is the crux of navigating adult life.

All of this to say, I’m 24 years old and I still have no idea what I want to be when I grow up. But what I do know is, through mental illness, maxed-out overdrafts, difficult times, and truly brilliant times, until the moment when we, individually, finally feel grown up, everything is totally fine.

Leonardo DiCaprio and pal Martin Scorsese team up for Devil In The White City

Long-time collaborator’s Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese are set to pair up once again, this time for an adaptation of The Devil In The White City: Murder, Magic And Madness At The Fair That Changed America. The novel, written by Erik Larson, is based on the true story of American serial killer Dr H. H. Holmes and was released in 2003 to a plethora of acclaim.

Industry favourite DiCaprio acquired the rights to the story in 2010, and now, five years later, production is finally in sight. With the actor and pal Scorsese attached, there was an auction – or as you can imagine, some kind of brawl – over who would distribute the movie, with Paramount coming out on top.

The true-life story takes place in 1893, and centres on both Holmes and architect Daniel H. Burnham. Billy (The Hunger Games) Ray will pen the screenplay, with the feature marking DiCaprio and Scorsese’s sixth cinematic collab. The pair have previously worked together on Gangs of New York, The Departed, and the 2014 memoir adaptation The Wolf of Wall Street.

In a daring role – and one which sticks to DiCaprio’s want to stray from convention – could this be the film to clinch that Academy win for the repeat nominee? Answers on a postcode.

Four reasons Suicide Squad already looks like a winner

DC’s Extended Universe and its Suicide Squad inhabitants won’t see its cinematic debut until August 2016, but audiences are already eagerly awaiting the date. With the Comic Con trailer receiving a wave of applause from both critics and DC fans, and naysayers basically won-over, David Ayer’s foray into super villains and Belle Reve is looking set to be a box-officer breaker and audience favourite. Why are spectators expecting such a good production? Here, I give you four solid reasons as to why Suicide Squad is already channeling a winning confidence.

1) Bad-ass villains as the protagonists

There’s nothing wrong with watching Batman or Spider Man save their respective cities. Superheros are generally loved – Avengers: Age of Ultron‘s whopping $1.398 billion box-office taking exemplifies the pleasure and enjoyment audiences gain from watching their favourite good-guy serving up justice amongst the likes of Electro and Penguin. But, what excites viewers here, is the thought of the tables being turned as they get to delve deep into the makings of, and bat-shit crazy minds of, some of DC’s darkest criminals. In Ayer’s Suicide Squad fans will watch as the likes of Harley Quinn, Slipknot, and Enchantress protect society against rogue villains – they might be being forced to do it by some super seedy government officials, but its all relative. No longer the characters you are meant to loath, you’ll be invited deep into their clique, as their back-stories and criminal enterprising become the centre focus of Ayer’s feature.

2) An ensemble cast to rival the best in old and new talent

the cast of suicide squad

the cast of suicide squad

Not to suggest that Will Smith and Viola Davis are getting old (ahem), but Suicide Squad boasts a stand-out cast of veteran acting talent, as well as a host of fresh new faces who have more then proved their worth on the silver screen. Performances that stuck out in the initial trailer include the apparent acrobat enthusiast Harley Quinn, played here by the compelling actress (and beauty) Margot Robbie – known for her Hollywood breakout in The Wolf of Wall Street – Mr Smith as marksmen Deadshot (get set for family flash-backs and a loveable rogue with this one), and – it likely goes without saying – Jared Leto as The Joker. Portrayed many times on the big screen by actors who were established for their diverse roles, the latter is an iconic character who is already loved amongst DC fans. Featuring for less then a minute at the end of the trailer, and seen in a still from the film, Leto’s Joker is Marylin Manson in look (soz, Marylin) and Heath Ledger-esque in sound. The difference here? It’s likely this clown will be R-rated, oh, and involved in a strange romance with Robbie’s Quinn – that adds a whole other dimension in itself. Jay Hernandez deserves a shout, too. Sporting facial tattoos and a bad temper (and that’s putting it lightly), the actor as El Diablo doesn’t feature too heavily in the initial trailer but the character is looking like one to watch come release.

3) The August 2016 release

It might seem like a bit of a weird reason as to why suicide Squad is promising big things, but simply, David Ayer and Warner Bros. Pictures aren’t rushing this one. It’s common that these big blockbusters get lumped with a huge budget, a short production process, and a quick release. Why? To bring in the dollar. It makes sense in terms of money-making, but it can often lead to a rushed, and lacking, final feature. What fans are seeing here is a good-looking and well-thought out trailer from a film that won’t meet its release for another year. If it’s looking like an epic at this stage, it’ll more than likely genuinely impress upon its debut – and look somewhat better than it already does. Good stuff, huh?

4) David Ayer taking the helm

The director attached as both helmer and writer basically speaks for itself. Known for critically applauded, and intimate explorations of strong character-driven stories, don’t expect an effects-centred feature. While it is likely that Suicide Squad will be effects heavy, fans won’t be left with all style and no substance, not with Ayer on board. Known for his South Central narratives in Training Day and Harsh Times, and last years war epic Fury, the director never does the same thing twice. Adding a new string to his bow with a comic book adaptation here, Ayer brings grit and adult content to the kind of adaptation that usually targets a youth audience.