Murder on the Orient Express Review

Kenneth Branagh directs a star-studded big-screen adaptation of Agatha Christie’s famed murder mystery in this fun, paired-back thriller.

Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express features lavish set pieces and creates atmosphere with snowy motifs and a brooding, genre-specific score. It’s not perfect, and it certainly doesn’t present anything out of the ordinary, but it’s a fun ode to a bygone style of filmmaking and is impressively extravagant in scale. Perhaps most enjoyable is the ensemble the director has managed to unite; Academy Award winners Penelope Cruz and Judi Dench, alongside nominees such as Michelle Pfeiffer and Johnny Depp, featuring stage veteran and Branagh favourite Derek Jacobi. There’s a bunch of relative newcomers too in the shape of Daisy Ridley, Sergei Polunin and Lucy Boynton. It’s a who’s who of the industry and benefits hugely because of it.

The story itself is familiar; a murder happens on board the Orient Express, a train packed with the wealthy and powerful. The ‘best’ detective in the world, Hercule Poirot (Branagh), must solve the crime before they arrive at their destination and it’s left to the authorities to handle. The joy in the whodunit genre is in us, the audience, working out who is the criminal and who is innocent. But in this unique tale it’s a lot harder to figure it out than one might first have thought. Michael Green was in charge of adapting the screenplay from Christie’s story and has done so with what one would assume is fierce loyalty for the source material. Branagh injects wit where neccessary and despite the dark nature of the genre, the film itself isn’t bulked down by it.

Murder on the Orient Express is in no way exceptional but it’s entirely watchable, and serves as a real treat to see such Hollywood heavy’s all lined up together (quite literally, in one scene).

 

 

Southpaw – This Gritty Boxing Drama Just Misses The Mark

Director Antonie Fuqua has displayed diversity in his work as a filmmaker. That diversity hasn’t always hit the mark, but one constant trait is a narrative full of grit and a visual that hits you straight in the jugular. Fuqua became a name to remember with his hard-hitting cop drama Training Day, since that effort he has flirted with various other feature films and with Southpaw the director returns to genre filmmaking. The 2015 movie is not a completely rewarding effort but it tackles the sport well and will leave you satisfied.

Southpaw has the story, the leading man – and even the theme song – to please any hardcore boxing fan. Jake¬†Gyllenhaal is an absolute triumph as 4-time lightweight world champion Billy Hope. The protagonist is hungry for the win and loyal to his family, made up of wife Maureen (Rachael McAdams in a short but poignant role) and daughter Leila (Oona Laurence). Hope grew up in the system and stands as a kind of poster child for rebellious youth made good, he rides that wave as one of the most famous sportsmen in the world. If you’ve seen the trailer you’ll know the rest for, unfortunately, there isn’t much touched upon in the full feature that goes amiss in the promotional teaser.

jake gyllenhaal and rachel mcadams in southpaw

jake gyllenhaal and rachel mcadams in southpaw

The film follows the formula of most boxing features but when done right this structure is an instant win. As an audience we see Hope go from having it all, to losing it all, to fighting (literally) to attain the former once more. The issue is the slow pace of the first half which eventually picks up once Forest Whitaker’s Tick Wills is introduced. You guessed it, Whittaker is the owner of a gym and he reluctantly becomes Hope‘s trainer. Gyllenhaal shares a touching chemistry with his co-star as together they embark on the boxers journey to emotional recovery. The leading man embodies his character appropriately and while he’s not entirely likeable his charectarisation is real and gritty as hell.

Fuqua knows how to direct his actors and because of this he prompts the best performance possible from all involved, with Laurence and McAdams both putting in stand-out supporting roles. While the ensemble is one of complete strength (and Hollywood appeal) – and a star might even have born in the shape of Oona Laurence – the story by Kurt Sutter lacks in all areas. There are several themes that could have been successfully explored, but the narrative becomes cliched and side-stories are never fully realised. The pacing is all wrong and there’s too much time spent studying a gym, rather than the people inside of it.

This is a good effort but it hasn’t got a patch on recent success story Creed.