The King review

David Michod’s The King combines different Shakespeare plays to deliver a lengthy historical tale that is light on action but big on human drama. Timothee Chalamet flexes his acting muscles, which are many and varied, while Joel Edgerton lends humorous support as Falstaff.

Netflix’s The King has been highly anticipated. Boasting big names and an even bigger budget, its a cinematic gem in scope and talent but it lacks in emotional depth and spectacle punch, leaving the feature a little lacklustre in finish. Reviews have, understandably, been varied. Some love it while others loathe it. Michod is a celebrated director in the independent realm, delivering Animal Kingdom and The Rover which were both met with unarguable acclaim. Here, it’s as though the championed director is slightly out of his depth, delivering a narrative that is disjointed and clunky and, at times, hard to follow.

Adam Arkapaw’s cinematography is the treasure of the piece. Combining beautiful green landscapes with moody sunsets, the land becomes a character and one you can’t help but marvel over. The action is slim on the ground here but the one battle scene that does feature is suitably disorientating, shot in the murky mud of a French battleground. The camera comes in close, demonstrating the claustrophobic horror of 15th century warfare; both unforgiving and feral.

Many have questioned Chalamet’s validity as a leading man of this calibre, but here he shows himself as an actor of depth, one who can match the very best as he stands shoulder to shoulder alongside peers Ben Mendelsohn and Edgerton. Every performance is stellar, including the wonderful Sean Harris who’s star turn is a joy to watch.

While The King is too long and lends itself (if unintentionally) to genre cliches, terrific cinematography and talented acting save it from the depths of poor period drama.

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