Recently Watched: Movie Roundup

by filmfookingcrazy

From genre-bending horror to indie drama, this is a quick roundup of the films that have recently graced my small screen.

Copenhagen

Mark Raso’s independent flick brings audiences to the stunning streets of Denmark’s capital as two people, brought together by chance, embark on a journey of self-discovery in this quietly touching coming of age drama.

Raso is unafraid to explore the complicated relationship that unravels between Effy (Frederikke Dahl Hansen) and William (Gethen Anthony) as she assists him in finding his grandfather in a city unfamiliar to him. The pair cycle through the sun-strewn streets of Copenhagen while connecting on an emotional level that captures its audience well. The cycling isn’t only a brilliant thematic metaphor for the journey in which our protagonists embark on, but the cinematography in these vignettes display well the beauty of the city and you could be forgiven for seeing Raso’s movie as a love-letter to Denmark’s vibrant capital.

Verdict: charming, genteel indie fare that’s a must for any fan of quaint romance and unforgettable scenery.

The Final Girls

An ode to B movies of the 1980’s, director Todd Strauss-Schulson has created a horror movie with style that pays tribute to the likes of Friday the 13th while openly acknowledging the much-lauded tropes of teen slashers.

Taissa Farmiga leads a small ensemble cast including Nina Dobrev and Alexander Ludwig in Schulson’s movie within a film (not as confusing as it sounds) as a group of school friends take a trip down the rabbit hole into the setting of fictional cult 80’s horror Camp Bloodbath. It’s ludicrous to its core and feels similar to recent comedy-horrors such  as The Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse, although The Final Girls comes packed with a surprising emotional depth that helps counter-balance moments of crude humour (courtesy of Adam Devine) that would otherwise consume the plot.

Verdict: it might be a little daft but in general, The Final Girls is a funny, fun – and occasionally touching – comedy that allows its young cast to shine.

Blair Witch

When Adam Wingard’s Blair Witch begins you can’t help but (mistakenly) think ‘here lies cinematic potential’. The narrative starts strong, as six young adults venture into those same haunted woods that frightened a generation of movie-goers in 1996. But, ultimately, the film is flawed and too familiar to standout as an original entry into the found-footage sub-genre.

This sequel (which reads more like an adaptation) does something to remind its viewer that the impact, and terror, of The Blair Witch Project was a one-off, one that can’t seem to be reimagined effectively. The original had a hazy aesthetic and most of the fear was in the fact you couldn’t really see what was going on at all, this new instalment is just too glossy to pass of as ‘found’ footage – and with not one likeable character, you’re having to pretend to care come the final, re-hashed moments.

Verdict: Adam Wingard certainly tries, but fails, to recreate the thrills and fear of the 1996 original that captured the imaginations of millions of movie fans. Here, he captures very little.

Everybody Wants Some!!

Everybody Wants Some!! (those exclamation points are just representative of my enthusiasm) follows a baseball team at a Texan university in the three days before term begins; friendships are made, romance blossoms and rivalry between men brews.

The ‘spiritual sequel’ to Richard Linklater’s hit coming-of-age Dazed and Confused, Everybody Wants Some!! is set over three days and consists mostly of men sat around drinking beer, smoking weed, talking about woman and sport. Not exactly a feminist dream. If you look deeper, there’s a whole lot more to the director’s newest feature though and the importance of that short time at university before lectures begin is pinpointed so perfectly here, as are the unique friendships that thrive in this environment. Blake Jenner leads a stand out cast and Wyatt Russell is particularly memorable as stoner Charlie. When together, the ensemble come to life and you feel as though you could be one of the gang as Linklater follows the team with a prying lens.

Verdict: This character-led feature is 116 minutes of pure joyous cinema that will evoke nostalgia in its older viewers and bestow excitement in its younger watchers. Glorious to watch and a joy on the ears thanks to a killer score, Everybody Wants Some!! is smile-inducing cinema.

 

Advertisements