Sing Street Review

by filmfookingcrazy

John Carney has shown himself to be a director of sheer, charismatic artistry. Creating feel-good comedy dramas that feature relatable characters and charming narratives, Sing Street is just the latest in a string of unmissable stories from Carney.

Reminiscent of The Commitments – and starring Maria Doyle Kennedy from Alan Parker’s cult hit – Sing Street is the lively, yet gently sentimental, story of Cosmo and his pals who put together a band to emulate their favourite 1980’s artists in order to escape the every day struggles of a Dublin in the grasp of economic strife. Queue fantastic musical elements, inspirational train rides and slow-mo walks – for the expected genre conventions are all present -, but with a sprinkling of originality.

Sing Street hits you in the face with witty comedy and heartfelt emotion, you’ll laugh and cry, and you’ll relish in the representation of adolescent relationships, from brotherhood to romance. John Carney directs with a whimsical eye, taking his viewers on a fun-fueled adventure through finding your feet in the tricky landscape of high school. His layered screenplay is lifted further by an ensemble cast of exceptional young actors, supported by some of the countries most-loved talent including Aidan Gillen, Don Wycherley, Lucy Boynton and Jack Reynor.

Walsh-Peelo and Boynton in Sing Street

Walsh-Peelo and Boynton in Sing Street

Ferdida Walsh-Peelo is brilliantly complex in the lead role as young musician Cosmo, falling in love with Boynton’s Raphina in a beautifully innocent plot thread that very nearly steals the whole film. Reynor is similarly outstanding as Cosmo‘s brother Brandon, a young adult who has lost his way in life. The relationship the two brothers share lends to several memorable moments in which Sing Street stands out as not just another teen drama, but an innovative story of navigating life with the support of those around you. All of this is wrapped in an Irish wit that is amiss in many similar titles, and features a number of toe-tapping original songs that capture the spirit of the time well.

A tale of the tribulations of family and friendship, a celebration of the bonkers style and diverse music of the 1980’s, and a sheer riot to watch, Sing Street is very simply unmissable cinema.

 

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