Fear the Walking Dead – The Dog and Not Fade Away

by filmfookingcrazy

The motives of army and government officials are always questionable in the zombie genre. Characters wait for their arrival, but events always go down-hill amongst their presence. We’ve seen it in 28 Days Later, Resident Evil and now in Kirkman’s Fear the Walking Dead. With only two episodes to go until the end of season one, the pace of the drama is picking up as the US army takes charge. Episode three, The Dog, and this weeks installment, Not Fade Away, were fantastic examples of Kirkman, Erickson and crew at their best. These latest episodes have also succeeded in proving one simple, yet entirely important, point: Fear the Walking Dead is a completely different entity to The Walking Dead. The only real similarity is the zombie narrative, and comparisons can no longer be drawn.

Surprisingly, the dark content isn’t related to the undead thus far. The real interest is coming from Frank Dillane’s Nick. He’s sneaky and clever as a drug addict willing to do anything to get his fix, and that anything is genuinely questionable. Dillane has an engaging quality despite his little screen time in the past two episodes and his sub-plot is increasingly becoming one of the best of the series. Cliff Curtis is exceptional as the head of the family. Travis wants to believe everything will be just fine and in a sense, he’s you and me, he represents the home viewer. Ruben Blades as Daniel provides enigma in terms of an interesting back-story and his moments of dialogue give us an insight into his torrid past. The Walking Dead has focused itself heavily on the theme of humanity, particularly in seasons four and five, as Rick and co’ have come to realise the biggest threat are those left alive. That same theme is seen in this new series, but straight off the cusp and warped to escape cliches and complaints.

Can we trust the army? Definitely not. Will all of the main cast survive series one? I bloody hope so. Fear the Walking Dead has proved itself to be a series of dramatic worth, with a talented cast – who might just be that little bit better than the large ensemble of TWD – who drive the tense narrative forward. I like it, I like it a lot.

 

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