Fear the Walking Dead: So Close, Yet So Far, review

by filmfookingcrazy

With only four episodes to go (gutting, I know) and a whole lot of ground still to cover, episode two of AMC’s Fear the Walking Dead didn’t do a lot in terms of picking up the pace. While we say goodbye to another character – which isn’t necessarily emotional considering how early on in the story we are – we also say hello to some gruesome content. Interestingly, said material is in relation to Nick‘s (Frank Dillane) drug problem, rather than people eating one another. The cold turkey sub-plot is still the most intriguing element to the multi-layered narrative, and the introduction of a new family into the mix is promising. What we have here is a small selection of characters, of different backgrounds and ethnicity’s, and this in itself realistically depicts a contemporary America (ignoring the zombies, of course). Kirkman’s current creation is genre-busting at its very best.

Despite the slow-movements of the virus taking its grip on Los Angeles and the lack of zombie-human combat scenes, director Adam Davidson and co have carefully created an intense and somewhat frightening portrayal of a city in distress. With The Walking Dead we never had the early days of the apocalypse, meaning we didn’t witness the collapse of society as the outbreak takes hold  of America. To produce a series that is entirely dedicated to portraying the beginnings of what Rick, Daryl and gang have been left to deal with is an exciting prospect, and one which I – and I’m sure millions of other viewers – can’t wait to watch unfold. From riots and police ‘brutality’ to distant screams and an ominous non-diegetic score, Fear the Walking Dead is shaping up to be an outstanding series from a talented team of writers, directors, and actors.

 

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